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Saint Patrick’s Day: Is it celebrated at NBW?

Have you been feeling unlucky recently? Well, Saint Patrick’s Day is approaching soon on March 17th, so be ready to indulge and share this newly found good fortune with your friends and family.

Saint Patrick’s Day is actually a religious holiday, but it is now celebrated by many different cultures for different reasons. It was originally celebrated in honor of St. Patrick’s death. Before he died, Irish thieves were invading his family’s land, and imprisoned St. Patrick. He was enslaved for six years in Ireland. During this time, he turned to Christianity in search of consolation. When St. Patrick was able to escape his prison, he dedicated his life to becoming a priest in order to convert the Irish to Christianity, as well as to be a minister to Christians living in Ireland already. The shamrock, in a religious aspect, was used by St. Patrick to represent the Trinity – The Father, The Son, and The Holy Spirit.

Wearing the color green, especially on Saint Patrick’s day, is said to bring good luck and fortune as well as give commendation to Ireland. According to The Christian Science Monitor, people wear green on Saint Patrick’s Day because “green is one of the colors in Ireland’s tri-color flag, and it has been used in the flags of several Irish revolutionary groups throughout history.” The Christian Science Monitor also says that green is so commonly worn on Saint Patrick’s Day because “Ireland is the ‘Emerald Isle’,” named for its lush green landscape. Green is also the color of spring, the shamrock, and the Chicago River, which the Midwestern city has dyed green on St. Patrick’s Day for the past 40-odd years.” A common Saint Patrick’s Day myth includes people who wear green on Saint Patrick’s Day appear hidden from leprechauns so they won’t get pinched; however, leprechauns will pinch people who don’t wear green.

In the Ireland, according to Aran Sweaters Direct, Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated with parades, wearing green, going to pubs, and spending time with families while children make shamrocks out of face paint and buy green parade floats such as blown-up hammers.

Similarly, in the U.S., according to timeanddate.com, Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated by attending parades and festivals on the streets, wearing green, attending Irish themed parties, going to the club, and eating and drinking green foods and beverages.

As far as students at NBW, ninth grade through twelfth grade, most students reported in a survey that they celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day with food. This includes going to McDonald’s for a Shamrock Shake, eating and drinking green-colored foods and beverages like Irish soda, eating corn beef, cabbage, carrots, mashed potatoes, stew, turkey, burgers, ham, and/ or pie, along with baking Saint Patrick’s Day themed treats.

Students at West reported that they also celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day by participating in parades like Irish Fest, going to friends’ houses, partying with friends, wearing green, pinching people who don’t wear green, and saying “happy Saint Patrick’s Day” to families and friends. Students who spend time with their families on Saint Patrick’s Day surveyed that they go out for lunch or dinner with their families, visit their grandparents’ houses, and help their younger siblings make traps to catch leprechauns.

In total, ninety-eight students were surveyed. About fifty-seven percent of students surveyed celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day, while about forty-one percent of students surveyed do not celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day at New Berlin West. Also, about forty-six percent of students surveyed are Irish, and about fifty-two percent of students surveyed are not Irish.

For all high school grade levels, ninth grade through twelfth grade, ninth grade students surveyed that about eighteen percent of them celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day with friends, about twenty-two percent of them celebrate with family, and about forty percent of them celebrate with both friends and family. Tenth grade students surveyed that about twenty percent of them celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day with friends, about forty percent of them celebrate with family, and about forty percent of them also celebrate with both friends and family. Eleventh grade students surveyed that about thirteen percent of them celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day with friends, about sixty percent of them celebrate with family, and about eight percent of them celebrate with both friends and family. Twelfth grade students surveyed that about forty-three percent of them celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day with friends, about forty-three percent of them also celebrate with family, and about twelve percent of them celebrate with both friends and family.

Coincidentally, about sixty-two percent of students surveyed that even though they aren’t Irish, they still do celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day, whereas about thirty-six percent of students surveyed that even though they are Irish, they don’t celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day.

All in all, Saint Patrick’s Day is known for its green apparel, green food, the shamrock, leprechauns, parades and festivals, and quality time spent with friends and family. Spread and share the luck during this years St. Patrick’s Day!

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